Plants

With fresh deliveries every week, our plants and flowers—from popular indoor plants to vibrant exotics to hardy succulents—liven up any space. Search by growing environment or size for more specific results. Please call to see if your favorites are currently in stock.

Ajuga
Ajuga reptans, commonly called bugleweed, is a dense, rapidly spreading, mat-forming ground cover which features shiny, dark green leaves. Whorls of tiny, blue-violet flowers appear in mid to late spring on spikes rising above the foliage to 10". Cultivars of this species feature leaves with more interesting and varied foliage color. When in full flower, large clumps of bugleweed can produce a striking display. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 10  CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Do not let dry out. FERTILIZER: Refer to growers instructions. FLOWERING: May to June. SOIL: Wide soil tolerance, but prefers moist, humusy soils. DISEASE: Crown rot can be a problem, particularly in the humid conditions of the deep South and in heavy soils. Avoid planting in wet, heavy soils, provide good air circulation and divide when clumps become overcrowded. Also avoid planting near perennial beds or lawns where its spreading nature could pose removal problems.
Alchemilla Mollis
Alchemilla mollis, commonly known as lady's mantle, is a clumping perennial which typically forms a basal foliage mound (6-12” tall ) of long-stalked, circular, scallop-edged, toothed, pleated, soft-hairy, light green leaves (to 6” across) each with 9-11 shallow rounded lobes. It is primarily native to mountain areas in eastern Europe (Carpathians, Caucusus and Turkey). Tiny, apetalous, star-shaped, chartreuse flowers appear in loose, spreading clusters (compound cymes) atop stems rising above the foliage to 12-18” in late spring to early summer. The tendency of plant leaves to retain moisture beads after a rain is considered to be a unique and attractive ornamental feature. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 8  CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Moist, well-drained soil FERTILIZER: Refer to growers instructions. FLOWERING: May to June. SOIL: Moist, well-drained soil DISEASE: No serious insect or disease problems. Can be an aggressive self-seeder. In hot summer climates such as Phoenix, leaves may scorch in full sun exposures or if soils are permitted to dry out.
Alternanthera
Alternanthera is a large genus of 200 species of bushy annuals and perennials that are grown mainly for their attractive colorful leaves, which are opposite, often toothed, and variable in size. Flowers are insignificant. Alternanthera are native to tropical and subtropical open forests in Central and South America. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 10 through 11 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Water the plants often enough to keep the soil from completely drying out.. FERTILIZER: Refer to growers instructions. FLOWERING: Flowers are insugnificant SOIL: Moist, well-drained soil DISEASE: Spider mites and Fusarium wilt can cause problems.
Alyssum
Alyssum plants are a tender and delicate annual. They are small and easy to grow. Alyssum are usually used as a border plant and also look really good growing in the nooks and crannies of a rock garden. They are good candidates for container gardens, too. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 7 through 11 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Water them during dry periods, once or twice per week. Soil should drain well. FERTILIZER: Add a general purpose fertilizer once a month. FLOWERING: Spring to early summer SOIL: They will do well in average soils and tolerate dry soil conditions. DISEASE: Alyssum are somewhat resistant to insects and disease. If insect or disease problems occur, treat early with organic or chemical insect repellents and fungicide.
Anchusa
Prized for deep intense blue flowers. Anchusa Dropmore is a clump-forming perennial which features forget-me-not-like flowers. This Mediterranean native blooms with upright spikes starting in May. Eye catching blue blooms make a nice addition to the perennial border, large container plantings, mass plantings, and edging fence lines. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 8 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Likes to dry out between wasterings. FERTILIZER: Refer to growers instructions. FLOWERING: Early summer, mid summer, late spring with depp blue flowers. SOIL: Likes a well drained soil. DISEASE: Crown rot can be a significant problem, particularly in wet, poorly drained soils. Taller plants usually need support. Plant stems tend to open up and flop and foliage tends to depreciate in summer after bloom, particularly in hot and humid summer climates such as the St. Louis area.
Angelonia
Angelonia is also called summer snapdragon, and once you get a good look at it, you'll know why. It has salvia-like flower spires that reach a foot or 2 high, but they're studded with fascinating snapdragon-like flowers with beautiful colorations in purple, white, or pink. It's the perfect plant for adding bright color to hot, sunny spaces. This tough plant blooms all summer long with spirelike spikes of blooms. While all varieties are beautiful, keep an eye out for the sweetly scented selections. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 8 through 11 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Angelonia should have regular watering for best performance, but established plantings are moderately drought tolerant. Allow the soil to dry out between waterings. FERTILIZER: Fertilize in spring, not heavily and keep (P) phosphorus on the low side. FLOWERING: Spring through Fall. SOIL: Use a well drained soil. DISEASE: Refer to growers instructions.
Anthemis
Easy to grow and tolerant of poor soils, this perennial bears brilliant yellow, daisy-like flowers from June until August. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 7 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Allow to dry out between waterings. FERTILIZER: Use a general mild fertilizer regularly. FLOWERING: Blooms through out the summer. SOIL: Tolerates droughty soil but requires well drained soil. DISEASE: May be infected by to powdery mildews. Deadhead to prevent self-seeding and encourage continued blooming. Plants can put so much energy into seed production that they die. Cut back in late summer to encourage basal growth for overwintering.
Aster
Growing Asters is easy. Perennial Aster flowers grow well in average soils, but needs full sun. Blooms are 2 inches in diameter, and are wilt resistant. Aster flowers come in blues, purples and a variety of pinks. All. Asters are yellow in the center of the flower. They are daisy-like in appearance, even though they are a member of the sunflower family. Did you know? The yellow center of Asters is actually comprised of many tiny flowerets. Asters come in a wide variety, with some less than a foot tall, while others are two feet tall or more. Both large and smaller varieties make good cut flowers for vases and arrangements. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 8 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. FERTILIZER: Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. FLOWERING: Summer/Fall. SOIL: Aster flowers grow well in average soils, but needs full sun. DISEASE: Asters are somewhat resistant to insects and disease. If insect or disease problems occur, treat early with organic or chemical insect repellents and fungicide.
Asteriscus
Beach Daisies are very durable, deer resistant plants that grow well near the seaside or under extremely dry conditions. They are excellent plants for growing in containers or hanging baskets, as a ground cover, border plant, or in your rock gardens. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 9 through 11 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Keep the soil moist during the first growing season. Once established, Asteriscus are very drought tolerant plants. FERTILIZER: Feed once in the spring just as new growth begins, using an balanced, all purpose fertilizer following the directions on the label. FLOWERING: Blooms during warm temperatures. SOIL: Aster flowers grow well in average soils, but needs full sun. DISEASE: Asters are somewhat resistant to insects and disease. If insect or disease problems occur, treat early with organic or chemical insect repellents and fungicide.
Astilbe
Perennial Astilbe is a great shade plant with rich, dense foliage and feathery, summer blooms for your shade garden. Also known as False Spirea and False Goat's Beard, Astilbe is native to Asia and North America. Astilbe plumes bloom in June-July. Colors include include pink, red, white, purple and peach. Plants grow 18" to as much as 5 feet. There is a dwarf variety that grows about 6". Astilbe looks its best when planted in groups. They look great in a flower bed, as border edging, or in containers. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 9 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Water the plants to keep the soil moist, preferably at all times. FERTILIZER: Astilbe are heavy feeders. In addition to a rich soil, add fertilizer high in nitrogen, on a regular basis. FLOWERING: Astilbe plumes bloom in June-July. Colors include include pink, red, white, purple and peach. SOIL: They need a soft soil, mixed with lots of humus or peat. DISEASE: Astilbe seldom have major problems with insects and disease. If insect or disease problems occur, treat early with organic or chemical insect repellents and fungicide.
Babtisia Australis
False blue indigo's spikes of clear blue flowers in late spring can nearly carry a border by themselves. They also make great cut flowers. Large, inflated nearly black seed pods set in after flowering, giving this plant another interesting element. It is low maintenance and will look great in any natural or informal setting. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 9 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Water thoroughly. FERTILIZER: once established it needs little or no supplemental fertilizer, other than an annual application of compost. FLOWERING: Blooms in the Spring with blue flowers. SOIL: Baptisia prefers open, porous, well-drained, even sandy, soil. DISEASE: Seeds can be eaten by weevils. Occassional fungal leaf spots, powdery mildew and rust occur. Overall this plant has few problems.
Bacopa
Bacopa (Sutera cordata) is a creeping evergreen plant that produces small, five-petaled flowers with golden centers from late spring to first frost. A perennial in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8b through 11, it is often used in hanging baskets, where it can spill over the sides, or as a groundcover. In cooler climates it is often used as an annual. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 8b through 11 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Bacopa requires regular water; allowing it to dry out or wilt can be fatal for the plant. FERTILIZER: Feeding at least once a month with a side dressing of compost or a foliar spray of liquid fish emulsion will keep it lush and green. FLOWERING: Depends on variety. SOIL: In soils with poor drainage, it can easily rot. DISEASE: Clear away the dead foliage and cut the stems back to 5 or 6 inches. Leaving the dead material in place can hold in too much moisture and lead to rotting.