Plants

With fresh deliveries every week, our plants and flowers—from popular indoor plants to vibrant exotics to hardy succulents—liven up any space. Search by growing environment or size for more specific results. Please call to see if your favorites are currently in stock.

Begonia
Now here's one of America's favorite flowers. With lots of variety, Begonias are popular in flowerbeds, hanging baskets, as container plants, and as indoor house plants. That's one versatile plant! Begonias are prized equally for their flower, as well as their showy leaves. When they are not in bloom, which is infrequent once established, their attractive, waxy green or chocolate colored leaves show themselves off wherever you have placed them. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 9 through 10 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Water container-grown begonias when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch. FERTILIZER: Fertilize your begonias less frequently during the wintertime when growth is slowed. Follow the instructions provided with your houseplant fertilizer. FLOWERING: Several begonia groups feature bright, colorful flowers, while others are grown primarily for their decorative leaves -- which can be textured, colored and ornamental due to their various shapes. SOIL: Use well drained soil. DISEASE: Depends on variety.
Bellis Galaxy
The original English Daisy is the wildflower Daisy that is often seen growing in lawns throughout the world. This rosette forming, low-growing biennial has now been hybridized to include double flowering, aster-like varieties in shades of white, pink, rose-red or purple. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 4 through 10 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Water regularly and thoroughly. English Daisies do no like to dry out! FERTILIZER: Feed monthly during the growing season using any good, all-purpose fertilizer. FLOWERING: Blooms in Spring and Summer. Removing faded flowers regularly will help keep plants blooming well into the summer. SOIL: Use light, rich, moisture retaining soil after all danger of frost has passed. DISEASE: Refer to growers instructions.
Bells of Ireland
Bells of Ireland are distinctive and stately plants, grown for their tall, dark green spires, thickly covered by lighter green, bell-shaped calyces (leaves). This annual plant grows 2-3 feet tall. The leaves are so lush, they all but hide the small white or pink flowers. Flowers bloom once during the season, with a pleasant scent. Surprise, surprise. Bells of Ireland are not native to Ireland. They are native to Syria, Turkey and the Caucuses. Bells of Ireland plants are a lucky symbols, perhaps linking their name to the luck of the Irish. They are also not related to the Molluca Islands, which their botanical name might otherwise suggest. The spikes of Bells of Ireland are used fresh or in dried arrangements. They are widely used for St. Patrick's Day arrangements. As a lucky symbol, they are also popular in wedding bouquets and arrangements. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 4 through 10 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Keep soil evenly moist. Water frequently in dry weather. FERTILIZER: Add a high nitrogen fertilizer once a month, to promote lush, healthy growth. FLOWERING: Spring thru Fall. SOIL: They do best in rich, loam soils, but will grow in average soils . DISEASE: Refer to growers instructions.
Bidens
Bidens is a perfect container plant. It spills down the edges of windowboxes, large pots, and planters with starry, yellow flowers and ferny, green foliage. Some varieties are fragrant so plant them where you can enjoy their sweet scent. Bidens likes rich, well-drained but moist soil. While it's a perennial in Zones 8-10, it's usually grown as an annual. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 8 through 10 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Bidens require good moisture levels but must be well-drained. It is important to ensure good drainage in both containers and landscaping, to prevent diseases like root rot.  FERTILIZER: Fertilizer or compost application will ensure optimal plant performance. Be sure to apply low to the ground, near the plant's main stem ( in order to avoid wetting the plant's foliage) for quick absorption and utilization. FLOWERING: Blooms in Spring, Fall and Summer. SOIL: Use well drained soil. DISEASE: Refer to growers instructions.
Brunnera m.
Brunnera macrophylla, commonly called Siberian bugloss, is a rhizomatous, clump-forming perennial that is primarily grown in shady areas for its attractive heart-shaped, dark green, basal foliage. Small, forget-me-not-like flowers of light blue with yellow centers bloom in airy, branched racemes rising well above the foliage on slender stems to 18" tall in spring. Basal leaves form a foliage mound which remains attractive throughout the growing season. Smaller upper leaves are elliptic. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 10 through 11 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Keep soil moist but not soggy. FERTILIZER: Fertilize every 2 weeks with Bordine's Better Blooms or similar, 20-20-20. FLOWERING: April to May with intense blue flowers. SOIL: Prefers rich soil that is kept moist but not soggy. DISEASE: No serious insect or disease problems. Slugs and snails are occasional visitors.
Caledula
The calendula (Calendula officinalis) is a cool-season annual or biennial plant from the Mediterranean region that grows well across the United States. Also known as the pot marigold, this daisy family (Asteraceae) member bears bright yellow to deep orange flowers from late fall through early spring in mild-winter climates. The large, showy, edible flowers and fragrant, grayish-green leaves make calendula a favorite for borders, herb gardens and flower beds. Calendula plants are easy to grow and require little care. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: All zones. CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Give your calendulas 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water once a week during hot weather. Although these plants can tolerate low-water conditions, regular irrigation encourages summer blooms. FERTILIZER: Mix 2 to 4 inches of compost into the planting soil to promote optimal plant health. Although fertilization isn't necessary for calendulas, incorporating an all-purpose fertilizer into the soil promotes vigor and flowering. The Utah State University Cooperative Extension recommends using 1 to 2 teaspoons of a 16-16-8 fertilizer for each square foot of planting area. FLOWERING: Blooms yellow and white. SOIL: Mix 2 to 4 inches of compost into the planting soil to promote optimal plant health. DISEASE: Keep an eye out for powdery mildew, a fungal disease that causes patches of white, powdery growth to appear on the calendula foliage. Remove any affected plant tissue and dispose of it immediately.
Calibrachoa
Calibrachoa or trailing petunia is a tender perennial which produces flowers that look like small petunias. These are compact, mounded plants which grow 3-9” tall on mostly trailing stems. Sometimes commonly called million bells, these plants are prolific bloomers that produce hundreds of 1” wide flowers from spring to frost. Flower colors include shades of violet, blue, pink, red, magenta, yellow, bronze, and white. Calibrachoa is not recognized as a separate genus by many authorities including the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) and Hortus Third. It is sometimes sold in commerce as Petunia ‘Million Bells’. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 9 through 11 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: The soil should be kept fairly moist but not soggy, especially in full sun areas as they may succumb to the intense heat of summer. Container plants require more watering. FERTILIZER: Calibrachoa care includes periodic fertilizer applications in the garden, though you may need to fertilize more regularly when in a container or hanging basket. FLOWERING: June to frost. Violet, blue, pink, red, magenta, yellow, bronze, white. SOIL: They prefer to be grown in moist but well-drained, organically rich soil in full sun. DISEASE: No serious insect or disease problems.
California Poppy
Popular is an understatement, as Poppies come in many, many varieties, and are native to many parts of the world, including Central and Southern Europe, China, India, and other parts of Asia. It's popularity also stems from the diversity of it's use. In the garden, Poppies are an attractive, easy to grow flower in both annual and perennial varieties. As an added bonus, the home gardener can choose from almost any color in the rainbow , including black. It's flowers are long lasting. Poppy seeds and oil are popular for baking and cooking. If you have excess seed, you can put them in your backyard bird feeder. In the world of medicine, and drugs, some Poppies are a narcotic. It is used to make Codeine, Morphine, and Opium. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 5 through 10 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Allow to dry out between waterings. FERTILIZER: Fertilize them once a month to promote steady growth. Mulching around the plants will help to keep weeds down and make the bed more attractive. FLOWERING: Poppy will grow quickly and will bloom in early to mid summer. SOIL: They will grow well in many types of soils and tolerate dry spells well. DISEASE: Poppy are fairly resistant to insects and disease. If insect or disease problems occur, treat early with organic or chemical insect repellents and fungicide.
Canna Tropical
Cannas are among the most colorful summer bulbs—as flamboyant as their tropical American ancestry—with ruffled spikes tapering to refined buds. These perennials come in a vast variety of color and boast immense, often-veined, paddle-shaped leaves and sheathing leafstalks in shades of green or bronze. With their great reedy canes and palmy foliage, cannas would be magnificent even if they never bloomed. However, they keep blossoming from late spring or early summer to frost. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 8 through 11 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Cannas do best with a good supply of water, so water the plants during the summer if the rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. Water freely in a dry spell. FERTILIZER: Use general fertilizer when blooming. FLOWERING: Summer and Fall. Red, Pink, Orange, Yellow, White flowers. SOIL: Use sandy or rocky soils. DISEASE: Slugs, snails, spider mites, and caterpillars may be problems. Refer to growers instructions.
Carnation
Carnations are very popular as boutonnieres, in corsages, bouquets, and in a wide range of floral arrangements. They grow big, full blooms on strong, straight stems. Their blooms last a long time. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 9 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Water them during dry periods, once or twice per week. FERTILIZER: Add a general purpose fertilizer once or twice a month. FLOWERING: White, Pink and Red. SOIL: They prefer full sun and a rich, well drained soil. DISEASE: Carnations have few problems with insects and disease. If insect or disease problems occur, treat early with organic or chemical insect repellents and fungicide as appropriate.
Cassia
Cassia plants, or candlestick bush (Senna spp.), produce evergreen foliage and seasonal yellow flowers. These low-maintenance plants grow well in garden beds in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 through 11, or you can enjoy them as large potted plants outdoors or inside. A mature cassia plant can reach 5 feet or taller, although container plants usually remain smaller. Cassia makes an easy care addition to beds, borders and butterfly gardens. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 9 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Water potted cassia when the top 1 inch of soil feels dry.  FERTILIZER: Add a general purpose fertilizer once or twice a month. FLOWERING: White, Pink and Red. SOIL: Grow cassia in well-drained soil that isn't prone to standing water. DISEASE: Monitor cassia plants for insects such as aphids and whiteflies, which are more likely to affect indoor plants.
Celosia
Celosia flowers, also called woolflowers or cockscombs, have unusual flowers that can bloom up to 10 weeks. These flowers can have red, pink, purple, gold or bicolored blooms. When many celosia flower blooms are next to each other, they collectively resemble fire, which is why the genus name Celosia, meaning burning in Greek, was chosen. The common name of cockscomb comes from the bloom’s resemblance to a rooster’s comb. Not all celosia flowers look this way – there are many shapes, colors and sizes (from 6 inches to 2 feet). Each blossom is made up of many tiny flowers, which is why this flower will produce numerous small seeds and keep sprouting in your plant containers with no extra effort on your part. Celosia flowers also look great in vases and bouquets, so you can bring their beauty indoors. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS: USDA hardiness zones: 3 through 11 CARE INSTRUCTIONS WATER: Keep the celosia flower's potting soil moist, but not wet. FERTILIZER: Fertilize the celosia flower once a month. These flowers thrive with a rich potting soil, so you may want to include compost or a fertilizer with a high amount of nitrogen. FLOWERING: Flowers can have red, pink, purple, gold or bicolored blooms. SOIL: Use well drained soil. DISEASE: Spider mites and aphids may become a problem insect pests with celosia flowers.